Vol 8 No 2 (2019): Volume 8, Issue 2, Year 2019
Articles

Physical Activity Level among Pre-University Students of Mangaluru City: A Cross-Sectional Study

Karuna Neupane
MPH scholar, Department of Public Health, K S Hegde Medical Academy Nitte (Deemed to be University), Mangaluru 575018 Karnataka, India
Mackwin Kenwood DMello
Assistant professor, Department of Public Health, K S Hegde Medical Academy Nitte (Deemed to be University), Mangaluru 575018 Karnataka, India
Published June 8, 2019
Keywords
  • Physical Activity,
  • Pre-University Students,
  • Adoloscents,
  • Students,
  • BMI
How to Cite
Neupane, K., & DMello, M. K. (2019). Physical Activity Level among Pre-University Students of Mangaluru City: A Cross-Sectional Study. International Journal of Physical Education, Fitness and Sports, 8(2), 29-35. https://doi.org/10.26524/ijpefs1924

Plum Analytics

Abstract

Physical activity is one of the best health promotion activities that enhance the overall health status, mental status and performance. There is decline in the physical activity by ten folds since last four decades among adolescence worldwide. Educational institutions have a prime role in enhancing physical activity among school going children’s through schedule classes. This study was conducted to determine the level of physical activity among the Pre-University students of Mangaluru city. The study also aimed to determine the nutritional status of the students using weight for height. Cross-sectional study was conducted in selected Pre-University colleges of Mangaluru city. The study period was from January 2019 to April 2019. In total 572 samples were collected. YPAQ for physical activity and Likert scale questionnaire for college based program were used to collect a data. Overall 50.5% of the students were found to be physically active in this study. In-house factors like type of college, type of streams (Science/Commerce/Arts), mode of transportation and personal factors like gender, gym workouts, household activities were significantly associated (p<0.05) with the level of physical activity respectively. Student’s regular participation in physical activity at college level was significantly associated (p<0.05) and were 3.76 times more active than students who did not participate. Regular physical activity schedule at the college level and motivation to participate along with studies will significantly improve the overall performance of the students.

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